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Chabot Space and Science Center reopens with hands-on ‘Nasa Experience’

Astronauts make reaching for the stars look easy. But the truth is, science and space exploration are about trying, testing, making mistakes and trying again.

“The NASA Experience,” a new exhibition at Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, captures the spirit of research and discovery by showing us the world through the eyes of NASA’s scientists and space crews. The special exhibition features artifacts and activities for all ages, and it’s the highlight of Chabot’s reopening Friday that follows 18 months of construction.

“The NASA Experience” is part of the Chabot’s new NASA Ames Visitor Center, and it’s guided by work that happens at the NASA Ames Research Center near Mountain View.

Space immersion

If you’re thinking about what you want to be when you grow up, this may be the show for you — the exhibition is all about getting hands-on experience with what it’s like to work in space exploration.

Visitors will find profiles of the many people and jobs at NASA, and they can build and test their own rover, plane and space robot, says Mary Catherine Frantz, Chabot’s communication manager. The exhibition also features more than 30 artifacts, including an enormous 80-by-120-foot wind tunnel blade that will blow your mind.

It takes about an hour or more to explore all of the hands-on activities, Frantz says.

Staff are excited to welcome visitors back to the center after an 18-month closure that started in March 2020. This has been the largest refresh of the center since 2000, and includes new signage, a new gallery and many new opportunities for learning, says executive director Adam Tobin.

Bay Area inspiration

“The NASA Experience” may be about what happens in the sky, but it has firm roots in the Bay Area. Chabot has collaborated with the NASA Ames Research Center for decades, Tobin says. The new namesake visitor center launches a new level of partnership between the two groups.

Other aspects of the partnership include Chabot’s “Learning Everywhere” initiative that collaborates with schools, public libraries, government agencies and community-based organizations and brings NASA content and artifacts to people across the East Bay. The partnership also develops connections between NASA’s career opportunities and Chabot’s youth development programs, Frantz says.

Tobin said:

“Underneath all of our work together is a goal of deeper equity and inclusion, and a specific opportunity to close the persistent STEM gap for women and people of color.” 

Reopening festivities

“The NASA Experience” expands peoples’ horizons at a time marked by isolation and questions about the value of science.

Frantz said:

“It’s important for people, especially children, to see themselves as scientists and recognize the many varied pathways to STEM careers. … This past year illustrated the importance of science education. Not only to make sure the next generation is prepared to fill the shoes of today’s science leaders, but also to create an informed citizenry.”

Chabot Space and Science Center planned three days of festivities and extended hours from Friday through Sunday.

Reopening weekend included visits from astronaut Dr. Yvonne Cagle and demonstrations by Galaxy Explorers, high school students who participate in Chabot’s hands-on education and community service program.

The teens guide visitors in building and testing their own rovers in the Roverscape, a landscaped courtyard with rocks and surfaces that are just like what you’d find at NASA Ames in Silicon Valley. Galaxy Explorers will also lead a robotics activity that simulates Astrobees — robots that work in zero gravity at the International Space Station.

Staff says it’s best to buy timed tickets in advance and check the website for visitor guidelines. “The NASA Experience” is not a permanent exhibition, but Chabot staff say their hope and expectation is the exhibition will be ongoing. There is no formal end date.

The center reopened to limited capacity, and timed tickets are required. Every guest over the age of 2 will be required to wear a mask. Tickets cost $19 for children over the age of 2, students and seniors, and $24 for general admission. For more information, visit chabotspace.org.


This story was first published on LocalNewsMatters.org, an affiliated nonprofit site supported by Bay City News Foundation.

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